The Use and Abuse of Antipsychotic Drugs in the Elderly

The use and abuse of antipsychotic drugs, particularly in the elderly, is a widespread problem.

Physical restraints are generally illegal, especially in the aged and frail because it is so easy injure them using physical bed restraints (tying them to the bed!) They have frail bones and its easy to tear their delicate skin. Not to mention it is degrading and inhumane.  We just don’t tie people up in nursing homes anymore.

Nevertheless, institutions are often horrifically understaffed and those on staff are overworked. So institutions have figured out ways to control their sometimes unruly residents by tying them down invisibly. Particularly those residents suffering from Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia. Chemical restraints. Specifically, medications that sedate and  make the residents more docile, or simply sleep through the day. The most commonly prescribed of these are antipsychotic drugs – Seroquel, one of the newer class of antipsychotics is one example. Haldol, an older class of antipsychotics is another. There are long lists of these and similar drugs that the FDA has warned should NOT be used in the elderly or dementia patients.  Indeed Seroquel, Haldol and their many “cousins” are dangerous for the elderly and dementia patients especially. So much so that the FDA has mandated a “black box” warning about the use of such drugs. in the elderly.

If you are looking after or advocating for an elder, particularly if they are living in an Assisted Living Facility or Nursing Home, you should be aware of this issue and be on the lookout for it. It is a very widespread problem.

There are people in our community better versed in this topic than I.  Recently, some good friends and colleagues recorded a TV program on the use of antipsychotic drugs in the elderly. I highly recommend it to anyone dealing with an aging loved one. It features:  Elder Law Attorney Claire Curry,  Dr. Mary Evans, geriatrician and president of the Virginia Association of Medical Directors, nurse Love Berkley, long term care specialist, and Emily Chewning, whose father suffered from dementia, was subjected to the misuse of antipsychotic drugs.


This is a widespread problem and happening in our own community every day.  If you suspect your loved one is improperly being prescribed antipsychotic drugs, please contact me and I will be happy to help you sort through what can be done or refer you to an appropriate agency that you can work with to make sure your friend or family member is safe and being appropriately medicated.

Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *